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Top recommendations from locals

Café
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“At the beginning of the 20th century, mythical place of the Montmartre artistic bohemian at its height, the cabaret Au Lapin Agile experienced a turbulent trajectory. Alternately inn, dance hall, cabaret, the Agile Rabbit "tells us about a time that the under twentys can't know", the tales of the bohemian and the secrets of a distant Paris. If the building that houses the Agile Rabbit was built in 1795, it was from 1860 that it became a popular guesthouse. On the heights of a rural Montmartre flourishes the peaceful village of artists planted with mills while lower down along the granting wall, pleasure and crime mingle in festive orgies. A tribute to this underwhelmed neighbourhood, the establishment was then called Au rendez-vous des voleurs and in 1869 became Le Cabaret des Assassins in reference to the walls decorated with paintings and engravings representing famous murderers such as Ravaillac or Troppmann. Around 1875, André Gill (1840-1885), a famous caricaturist from La Butte, used to the area, imagined a rabbit in a frock coat leaping from a saucepan as a sign. A legend has it that it could well be a self-portrait of the artist in a runaway rabbit, a reference to the fact that Gill, who participated in the Commune in 1871, escaped without damage. The local residents then got into the habit of naming the ringette after the Gill Rabbit, which gradually became the agile Rabbit. The original sign was stolen in 1893 and on the one that replaced it, the bug lost its green frock coat. Around 1900, the place was taken over by Frédéric Gérard (1860-1938), known as Father Frédé. A colourful character from Montmartre, an unhappy cabaret owner who had just been forced to close his establishment Le Zut following a fight that turned into a riot between the local marlous, he took with him a whole menagerie: the donkey Lolo, the bitch Friska, a monkey, a raven, white mice. Friends of painters and poets, he animates the evenings of the Agile Rabbit by singing realistic songs and romances that he accompanies on guitar. Rapins, writers, crooks, anarchists all find themselves together in a mixture of singular genres. We meet Maurice Utrillo, Georges Braque, Amadeo Modigliani... Apollinaire reads the poems from his collection Alcools. In 1905, Pablo Picasso offered a painting, the Harlequin by the glass. He represents himself as a harlequin with a glass at the counter, Frédé with the guitar at the back. This painting remained on the wall of the Agile Rabbit until 1911, when Father Frédé sold it for a few thousand francs, feeling that Picasso was beginning to be known. He should have waited. It was purchased for a few million francs in 1989 by the Metropolitan Museum of New York. The décor of the Agile Rabbit is enriched with works that unsilvered artists exchange for a meal or as a token of their appreciation. Now a true cultural institution, the Agile Rabbit welcomes artists and thugs, but Father Frédé, who would like to rebuild his reputation, is trying to keep the thugs away from his cabaret. Tensions were at their height in 1910, during an incident in which his son Totor, Victor, died from a stray bullet behind the counter. In 1913, the building, which was threatened with destruction, was bought by Aristide Bruant, a famous lyricist living opposite the Maison Rose, who left its management to Father Frédé. Until 1914, under the great acacia tree, the Agile Rabbit was the bohemian's home, but after the war, artists who preferred Montparnasse to Montmartre did not return. As the Maquis de la Butte and its village atmosphere gradually disappeared, in 1922, Aristide Bruant sold the cabaret to Paulo, to whom he had taught to sing, Frédé's son. In 1972, Paulo handed over the management to Yves Mathieu, his son-in-law, who continues the tradition today. The original lower room has been preserved and the singing evenings for a very touristic audience rely on catchy complaints rather than text songs.”
  • 64 Einheimischen empfohlen
Bar
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“Authentic and trendy parisian restaurant. Simple food, not too expensive. You will like the area and athmosphere.”
  • 58 Einheimischen empfohlen
Outdoor Sculpture
“We can see the Sacré Coeur at the end of the charming rue de l'Abreuvoir, which we will immediately take. Borrowed by the population to obtain water, it then leads to the water trough of Montmartre, now disappeared, where horses and cattle are driven in the evening, below the current Dalida Square. The Chemin de l'Abreuvoir, which became a street in 1863.”
  • 36 Einheimischen empfohlen
Café
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“It's ultra delicious restaurant, table you can get only by reservation, it's a little bit expensive, but believe me, it's worth”
  • 35 Einheimischen empfohlen
Bistro
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“Can't do more Paris style then this one. Get an omelette-frite, half a bottle of wine, and you're good”
  • 27 Einheimischen empfohlen
Bar
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“Nice little bar with a psychelelic atmosphere serving good beers and sophisticated cocktails. You can also order cooked insects if you're up to...”
  • 10 Einheimischen empfohlen
Bar
“On y va pour le brunch pas cher (18€) mais complet le dimanche. Je ne me lasse pas de leurs oeufs Bénédicte et leur chocolat chaud.”
  • Von 1 Einheimischem empfohlen
Bar
  • Von 1 Einheimischem empfohlen