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Museum

The Bourbon Tunnel

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Tipps von Einheimischen

Maria
Maria
March 29, 2019
A good alternative to Napoli Sotterranea's crowds. Discover its endless tunnels and galleries. The best surprise is reserved for the end :)
Davide
Davide
August 8, 2018
English & info below. Riscopri l'antica via di fuga delle truppe della II Guerra Mondiale, Scendi alla scoperta del lago sotterraneo e ripercorri 500 anni di storia della città. Disponibili diversi percorsi adatti a tutte le esigenze. Retrace the escape path from the Second World War, discover the…
Pasquale
Pasquale
August 5, 2017
Passeggiare nelle viscere di Napoli, esperienza molto suggestiva. Walking in the bowels of Naples, a very impressive experience
Gabriella
Gabriella
September 5, 2016
Traverse five centuries along Naples’ engrossing Bourbon Tunnel. Conceived by Ferdinand II in 1853 to link the Palazzo Reale to the barracks and the sea, the never-completed escape route is part of the 17th-century Carmignano Aqueduct system, itself incorporating 16th-century cisterns. An air-raid…
Fabio
Fabio
September 1, 2016
Amazing trip deep inside Naples

Einzigartige Aktivitäten in der Umgebung

Unterkünfte in der Nähe

Das empfehlen Einheimische

Kunstmuseum
“Via Francesco De Sanctis, 19/21 - Naples, Opening hours: from 9.30 am to 6.00 pm - except on Tuesday which is closed. Admission 7 euros www.museosansevero.it/”
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Opera House
“The most beautiful theatre of the world is 10 minutes walking from Mariolina Amato Art Gallery! Don't lose the visit!”
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Schloss
“The oldest castel of the town. The Legend says that Virgilio hid an egg in its foundations that Is capable to keep standing the entire fortress.”
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Museum
“The Palazzo Reale is a historic building which is very pleasant to see. Although the piazza is very mesmerizing, it also leads to the ocean which again offers gorgeous views and a relaxing stroll along the seashore. ”
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Museum
“by: CIRCUMVESUVIANA - STOP: PIAZZA GARIBALDI. METRO LINEA 1 - STOP:MUSEO. or METRO LINEA 2 - STOP : PIAZZA CAVOUR. With its rich and unique archaeological collections, this is one of the most ancient and important museums in the world. Its creation is closely tied to the figure of Charles III of the Bourbon dynasty who ascended to the throne of Naples in 1734. He promoted on the one hand the excavations of the Roman towns buried by the eruption of 79 AD and on the other the project of setting up a Museo Farnesiano, moving to Naples part of the rich collection he had inherited through his mother Elisabeth Farnese. It was his son Ferdinand IV who chose the current building to house both the Farnese collection and the relics from the Vesuvian towns, which are still today the Museum’s core collections. The palace, erected as royal cavalry barracks at the end of the 16th century, became the seat of the University of Naples from 1616 to 1777, when it was enlarged and refurbished by the architects Fuga and Schiantarelli. The first galleries were set up during the French Decade (1806-1815) and with the Restoration of the Bourbons in 1816, it became the Real Museo Borbonico. Initially conceived as an encyclopedic museum, it included different Institutes and laboratories (Royal Library, Drawing Academy, Officina dei Papiri and an astronomical Observatory never to be completed), which were all moved to other locations at different times. After the unification of Italy in 1860, it became the National Museum. Its collections were gradually expanded through the acquisition of finds from excavations in Campania and Southern Italy, as well as from private collections. The transfer of all the paintings to the Museum of Capodimonte in 1957, determined its sole identity of Archaeological Museum. With its rich and unique archaeological collections, this is one of the most ancient and important museums in the world. Its creation is closely tied to the figure of Charles III of the Bourbon dynasty who ascended to the throne of Naples in 1734. He promoted on the one hand the excavations of the Roman towns buried by the eruption of 79 AD and on the other the project of setting up a Museo Farnesiano, moving to Naples part of the rich collection he had inherited through his mother Elisabeth Farnese. It was his son Ferdinand IV who chose the current building to house both the Farnese collection and the relics from the Vesuvian towns, which are still today the Museum’s core collections. The palace, erected as royal cavalry barracks at the end of the 16th century, became the seat of the University of Naples from 1616 to 1777, when it was enlarged and refurbished by the architects Fuga and Schiantarelli. The first galleries were set up during the French Decade (1806-1815) and with the Restoration of the Bourbons in 1816, it became the Real Museo Borbonico. Initially conceived as an encyclopedic museum, it included different Institutes and laboratories (Royal Library, Drawing Academy, Officina dei Papiri and an astronomical Observatory never to be completed), which were all moved to other locations at different times. After the unification of Italy in 1860, it became the National Museum. Its collections were gradually expanded through the acquisition of finds from excavations in Campania and Southern Italy, as well as from private collections. The transfer of all the paintings to the Museum of Capodimonte in 1957, determined its sole identity of Archaeological Museum. ”
  • Von 218 Einheimischen empfohlen
Standort
4 Vico del Grottone
Napoli, Campania 80132
Telefonnummer+39 081 764 5808