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Museum

Museo e Real Bosco di Capodimonte

Von 95 Einheimischen empfohlen ·

Tipps von Einheimischen

Vito
Vito
July 31, 2019
Originally designed as a hunting lodge for Charles VII of Bourbon, the monumental Palazzo di Capodimonte was begun in 1738 and took more than a century to complete. It's now home to the Museo di Capodimonte.
Francesca
Francesca
September 18, 2019
the Capodimonte park, formerly Real Parco di Capodimonte, is a city park in Naples, located in the Capodimonte area, in front of the homonymous palace.
Simone
Simone
September 5, 2019
wonderful museum inside the park of the same name. the greenest space in Naples
Marco
Marco
December 16, 2019
Consigliamo visita al Museo e all’annesso Parco.
Alessia
Alessia
August 12, 2019
Important pinacoteca and 1700 armery and a extraordinary room in porcellana .. don’t miss
Alessandro
Alessandro
November 13, 2019
This is one of the best choices in Naples, with a spectacular Museum and garden around where lie with magnifique landscape. Then there's the wood where you can walk or run for long miles... I really love it!
Matteo
Matteo
September 6, 2019
Definitely one of the best Museum of the city of Naples. Full of classic art treasures , from great italian painters to royal families treasures who ruled Naples in the past

Einzigartige Aktivitäten in der Umgebung

Unterkünfte in der Nähe

Das empfehlen Einheimische

Museum
“by: CIRCUMVESUVIANA - STOP: PIAZZA GARIBALDI. METRO LINEA 1 - STOP:MUSEO. or METRO LINEA 2 - STOP : PIAZZA CAVOUR. With its rich and unique archaeological collections, this is one of the most ancient and important museums in the world. Its creation is closely tied to the figure of Charles III of the Bourbon dynasty who ascended to the throne of Naples in 1734. He promoted on the one hand the excavations of the Roman towns buried by the eruption of 79 AD and on the other the project of setting up a Museo Farnesiano, moving to Naples part of the rich collection he had inherited through his mother Elisabeth Farnese. It was his son Ferdinand IV who chose the current building to house both the Farnese collection and the relics from the Vesuvian towns, which are still today the Museum’s core collections. The palace, erected as royal cavalry barracks at the end of the 16th century, became the seat of the University of Naples from 1616 to 1777, when it was enlarged and refurbished by the architects Fuga and Schiantarelli. The first galleries were set up during the French Decade (1806-1815) and with the Restoration of the Bourbons in 1816, it became the Real Museo Borbonico. Initially conceived as an encyclopedic museum, it included different Institutes and laboratories (Royal Library, Drawing Academy, Officina dei Papiri and an astronomical Observatory never to be completed), which were all moved to other locations at different times. After the unification of Italy in 1860, it became the National Museum. Its collections were gradually expanded through the acquisition of finds from excavations in Campania and Southern Italy, as well as from private collections. The transfer of all the paintings to the Museum of Capodimonte in 1957, determined its sole identity of Archaeological Museum. With its rich and unique archaeological collections, this is one of the most ancient and important museums in the world. Its creation is closely tied to the figure of Charles III of the Bourbon dynasty who ascended to the throne of Naples in 1734. He promoted on the one hand the excavations of the Roman towns buried by the eruption of 79 AD and on the other the project of setting up a Museo Farnesiano, moving to Naples part of the rich collection he had inherited through his mother Elisabeth Farnese. It was his son Ferdinand IV who chose the current building to house both the Farnese collection and the relics from the Vesuvian towns, which are still today the Museum’s core collections. The palace, erected as royal cavalry barracks at the end of the 16th century, became the seat of the University of Naples from 1616 to 1777, when it was enlarged and refurbished by the architects Fuga and Schiantarelli. The first galleries were set up during the French Decade (1806-1815) and with the Restoration of the Bourbons in 1816, it became the Real Museo Borbonico. Initially conceived as an encyclopedic museum, it included different Institutes and laboratories (Royal Library, Drawing Academy, Officina dei Papiri and an astronomical Observatory never to be completed), which were all moved to other locations at different times. After the unification of Italy in 1860, it became the National Museum. Its collections were gradually expanded through the acquisition of finds from excavations in Campania and Southern Italy, as well as from private collections. The transfer of all the paintings to the Museum of Capodimonte in 1957, determined its sole identity of Archaeological Museum. ”
  • Von 218 Einheimischen empfohlen
Kunstmuseum
“Via Francesco De Sanctis, 19/21 - Naples, Opening hours: from 9.30 am to 6.00 pm - except on Tuesday which is closed. Admission 7 euros www.museosansevero.it/”
  • Von 329 Einheimischen empfohlen
Kunstmuseum
“The impressive, three-storey building that hosts the museum is situated in the very heart of Naples’ historical centre and was renovated by Portuguese archistar Alvaro Siza. ”
  • Von 88 Einheimischen empfohlen
Friedhof
“A beautiful and very suggestive place, that few tourists know; the place is very easily reached with a 15-minute walk within the health district. The museum is free and represents an important place for the "sacred and profane" Naples.”
  • Von 95 Einheimischen empfohlen
Schloss
“From this point, you will be able to see the entire view of Napoli. Not only can you see the gorgeous ocean, you will also be in the prime spot to view Spaccanapoli.”
  • Von 109 Einheimischen empfohlen
Standort
2 Via Miano
Napoli, Campania 80131
Telefonnummer+39 081 749 9111
Kreditkarten
Nein
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